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A subrogation letter is written by a third party, who in addition to the plaintiff in a case, aims to pursue the defendant for compensation. For example, if someone was injured in a car accident and received care at a hospital, the hospital might end up sending them a subrogation letter. The letter would contain 10 to 12 questions about the car accident claim, as well as a request for the claim number and the name of the defendant’s auto insurance company. Once equipped with this information, the hospital would be able to alert the defendant’s insurance company that the defendant owes them money for medical care that was provided to the injured plaintiff, and inform the insurance company that they need to be reimbursed prior to the plaintiff being reimbursed.

If a plaintiff finds themselves under these circumstances, they should obtain an attorney who will not only fight against the defendant’s insurance company, but also negotiate with the hospital to lower the amount of their subrogation lien. For example, if a patient/plaintiff owes $10,000 in medical bills and doesn’t require any follow-up visits, there may be a lien in the amount of $10,000 from the hospital, which would leave the plaintiff with nothing. By negotiating down the subrogation lien and convincing the hospital to accept only one or two-thirds (or even less) of that amount, an attorney could save the plaintiff a lot of money. A plaintiff who has received a subrogation letter should find a personal injury attorney who can speak on their behalf.

Subrogation lien letters usually come from a person’s health-insurer: Blue-Cross, Blue Shield, United Healthcare, Aetna, and Humana are the largest in Illinois. These health insurers might use a third-party administrator like Rawlings or Optum. If someone receives one of these letters, they should call their attorney right away. Some of the hospitals in this area use law firms called Powers and Moon or Neil J. Greene to negotiate their liens. If someone gets a letter from Powers and Moon or Neil J Greene’s Office, it’s important that they hire a personal injury attorney who can negotiate up the defendant’s insurance company and negotiate down with the third-party administrator or law firm that is representing the hospital.

For more information on Receiving A Subrogation Letter In Illinois, a free initial consultation is your next best step. Get the information and legal answers you are seeking by calling (815) 495-5598 today.

Balke & Williams

Call Now For A Free Strategy Session
(815) 495-5598